Mechanical Engineering
 

Dynamic System Modeling and Analysis

Dynamic System Modeling and Analysis
Formulating mathematical models for mechanical, electrical, fluid, and combined systems; numerical solution of motion equations; first- and second-order systems, frequency response, and transfer functions.
ME EN
335
 Hours3.0 Credit, 3.0 Lecture, 1.0 Lab
 PrerequisitesMATH 303 & ME EN 273 & CE EN 204; or MATH 334 & ME EN 273 & CE EN 204; concurrent enrollment in Me En 330.
 TaughtFall, Winter, Spring
 ProgramsContaining ME EN 335
Course Outcomes: 

Mechanical Systems

1. Students should have a knowledge of fundamental systems concepts required to develop lumped element models for basic mechanical systems, including inertia, compliance, dissipation, and power sources, and obtain equations of motion for linear motion and fixed-axis rotation.

Electrical Systems

2. Students should have a knowledge of fundamental systems concepts required to develop lumped element models for basic electrical systems, including inductance, capacitance, resistance, power sources and amplifiers.

Basic Fluid Systems

3. Students should have a knowledge of fundamental systems concepts required to develop lumped element models for basic fluid systems, including inertance, capacitance, resistance, and pumps.

Multi-domain Modeling

4. Students should have a knowledge of fundamental concepts of multi-domain modeling of electromechanical and fluid/mechanical systems and be able to develop lumped element models of these mixed systems.

Simulation Software

5. Students should know how to place equations of motion into state variable form, and to develop a simulation for basic non-linear and linear systems using MATLAB or some other simulation software.

Transfer Functions and Poles

6. Students should know how to manipulate a system of linear differential equations to obtain transfer functions and poles (eigenvalues).

Interpret Poles

7. Students should understand first and second-order systems and know how to interpret poles (eigenvalues) to define natural frequencies, damping ratios, time constants, and the natural response, step response, and impulse response of a system.

Frequency Response

8. Students should understand the concept of frequency response. They should understand the relationship between transfer functions and frequency response, and should be able to obtain frequency response plots for their system models using MATLAB.

Real World Application

9. Students should use the BYU ME method to 1) transform a real-world dynamic system into an engineering problem and 2) develop and analyze a lumped-element model to solve the engineering problem. Students communicate their process and results to others.